Last year, the War on Stupid talked about how John Oliver was a model for high-quality information translation practices. He has the ability to take complex issues like the prison-industrial complex or net neutrality and repackage into something more readily accessible for laypeople. Earlier in February, communications shop Blue Engine Media dropped a similar read, but focused specifically on Oliver’s use Monroe’s Motivated Sequence, a popular structure for persuasion. The sequence looks like this:

  1. Get their attention
  2. Present the problem
  3. Offer hope
  4. Visualize the solution
  5. Ask for action

Fun fact: Monroe’s sequence has been around since the 1930s, when it was developed by Alan Monroe, a professor at Perdue.

They make some interesting points about how that same communication model can be crucial for issue advocacy, particularly as a means of getting people to forge emotional connections with particular issue stances. Head over to Blue Engine get the whole story on how to make friends and influence people.

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